Relative age dating superposition

Relative dating is used to arrange geological events, and the rocks they leave behind, in a sequence.

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Unlike people, you can’t really guess the age of a rock from looking at it.

Yet, you’ve heard the news: Earth is 4.6 billion years old. That corn cob found in an ancient Native American fire pit is 1,000 years old. Geologic age dating—assigning an age to materials—is an entire discipline of its own.

Pretty obvious that the dike came after the rocks it cuts through, right?

With absolute age dating, you get a real age in actual years.

By applying the law of superposition, relative dates can be determined.

This law states that in any undisturbed sequence of rocks deposited in layers, the youngest layer is on top and the oldest is on the bottom.For example, which is older, the bricks in a building or the building itself?Are there repairs or cracks in the sidewalk that came after the sidewalk was built?But the most accurate forms of absolute age dating are radiometric methods. Sedimentary rocks in particular are notoriously radioactive-free zones.This method works because some unstable (radioactive) isotopes of some elements decay at a known rate into daughter products. Half-life simply means the amount of time it takes for half of a remaining particular isotope to decay to a daughter product. Good discussion from the US Geological Survey: geochronolgists just measure the ratio of the remaining parent atom to the amount of daughter and voila, they know how long the molecule has been hanging out decaying. So to date those, geologists look for layers like volcanic ash that might be sandwiched between the sedimentary layers, and that tend to have radioactive elements.As a member, you'll also get unlimited access to over 79,000 lessons in math, English, science, history, and more.

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